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device
03-30-2009, 07:57 PM
anyone have a design ideas i need to build about three of them for my new shop and am looking for a decent design..
something sturdy..
1/4 plate top mayby?
4x6, 4 x8' 3x7' what does everyone else use?

Bounder
03-30-2009, 09:25 PM
I've worked with the entire spectrum of tables over the years, made of wood and metal.

The size of your tables could depend upon what you need and the size of your shop. My last shop was 7000 sq. feet and we had 18 tables.

What worked best for us as far as size was two sizes. Some were about 40X82, others 40X30. We found the short tables very convenient for the smaller jobs.

We did have two tables that were just under 4'wide and 8 feet long that we used for 3000 lb. loads.

1/4" plate is over kill unless you're going to use it as a welding table.

Device tell me a little about your requirements and what you can work with to fab the tables. Size of sheets you handle, how heavy etc., I'll get back to you tomorrow, it's bed time here on the east coast.

Easiest and cheapest would be 1 1/2 X 1 1/2 X 1/8 angle iron. They held up very well over the years but we didn't use them for the heavy loads.

One thing not to skimp on are casters. Put cheap undersized casters on tables and you will regret it.

MattM
03-30-2009, 09:33 PM
What ever you make be sure it is rated for the weight you intend to use on it. I've seen a commercial-grade metal desk converted into work bench tables that easily handle 3,000 pounds of material on them. It sat on a iron cart with one set of fixed wheels and one set of caster wheels. The top was covered with plywood and had buttressing from the plywood to the side of the desk to give a sturdy 8' long workbench.

device
03-30-2009, 11:37 PM
well..
i have used a number of tables over the years..what we have now is 2 tables 1/4 plate surfaces 4'x8' (2x2tubing 3/16 walluprights and xcross members) and a few 4x4 tubing and 40"x8' but they are almost useless..and we have over 10 k workspace..
i was thinking a couple 10 footers 1/4 tops 30" wide .. 1x2tubing 1/8" wall uprights and xcross members but with undertables..
anyone use ones with sheet shelves underneath
table will be for making countertops and snks and hoods..(ss)
not heavy steel welding but must maintain absolute straight flat surface i can clamp to..and not scratch material layed ont it..

Bounder
04-01-2009, 03:18 PM
Tall order there device, metal tabletops and stainless hoods are a poor match.

I would fabricate a table with a top that could be changed often, be it plywood or masonite, put down with a contact cement but only glue one side not two so it could be removed. That would be on top of what ever size you choose be it 1/4" or 1/8 steel.

The frame on the top would be a heavy channel 3"X4.1 or 4"X5.4 even. With the web turned out it will give a place to clamp. With channel this heavy I don't think you need any cross pieces. My tables were 8' long with 3" channel.

Pipe is cheaper than square tube and I don't think the 1/8 is strong enough to hold the amount of weight a 1/4" top plus a hood and whatever else may be put on it. If it was me I'd go with 2" schedule 40 pipe for the uprights.

Over the years I worked with tables that it was tried to incorporate storage space under them. My experence failed for two reasons that may not be your case.

First the tables were moved all the time in a HVAC shop, the items shook till they fell off which was often.
Second, it was a dirty environment. Dust from the insulation used in the ducts covered the bottom of the tables making what was there a mess to work with.

You wrote of making shelves, we just had one big shelf at the bottom.

Make sure the apron on the bottom of the table is high enough that no one gets their foot and ankle caught under it. Saw that happen to someone, it laid him out on the floor. He was pulling with someone on the other end pushing. He fell, the other person didn't see him fall, the pusher kept pushing.

He was OK, he was the owner but never did he fix the table. More than one of us got pinched by it.

device
04-01-2009, 03:45 PM
Tall order there device, metal tabletops and stainless hoods are a poor match.

I would fabricate a table with a top that could be changed often, be it plywood or masonite, put down with a contact cement but only glue one side not two so it could be removed. That would be on top of what ever size you choose be it 1/4" or 1/8 steel.

The frame on the top would be a heavy channel 3"X4.1 or 4"X5.4 even. With the web turned out it will give a place to clamp. With channel this heavy I don't think you need any cross pieces. My tables were 8' long with 3" channel.

Pipe is cheaper than square tube and I don't think the 1/8 is strong enough to hold the amount of weight a 1/4" top plus a hood and whatever else may be put on it. If it was me I'd go with 2" schedule 40 pipe for the uprights.

Over the years I worked with tables that it was tried to incorporate storage space under them. My experence failed for two reasons that may not be your case.

First the tables were moved all the time in a HVAC shop, the items shook till they fell off which was often.
Second, it was a dirty environment. Dust from the insulation used in the ducts covered the bottom of the tables making what was there a mess to work with.

You wrote of making shelves, we just had one big shelf at the bottom.

Make sure the apron on the bottom of the table is high enough that no one gets their foot and ankle caught under it. Saw that happen to someone, it laid him out on the floor. He was pulling with someone on the other end pushing. He fell, the other person didn't see him fall, the pusher kept pushing.

He was OK, he was the owner but never did he fix the table. More than one of us got pinched by it.
great advice bounder..
that gives me some more idears..
thats why i dig this forum..
i think some 3/4 or 1" good one side playwood might do for the work tops..
when you say web turned out do you mean the legs of the c channel to the inside of the table..so the outer edge of the table would be 4 " if i was using 3" web channel?
cheers
p

cactassdupree
04-01-2009, 05:01 PM
All good ideas! I like tables that have 2 fixed wheels and 2 that swivel so you can drive it any where you want. If all 4 wheels swivel that thing will walk you all over the shop and into everything. I like a plywood top with masonite on top so it can be changed when needed. Some need to be over 10' long so you can prick off 10' stock (flashing). You can take 1/8" thick angle iron for a nice edge to tap on if you want to get fancy. 1/8" masonite fits in there nice for a flush top. It helps for breaking things over the edge too. happy trails everyone :)

I forgot to mention to make the height about as high as your brakes so it will hold up the metal if you have to push it through for any long distances.

Bounder
04-01-2009, 09:33 PM
Legs of the channel turned out so you can use finger clamps to secure the hood to the table. Yes it would be 3" or 4" depending upon what channel you choose.

Sounds as if you are thinking of using 3/4 or 1" plywood in place of a heavy plate top? Should work, countersink the machine screws to they don't damage the hoods. Do you have to weld against the table surface? Know it will not break out on fire but it smolders, stinks and the top wears out fast. That's aside from leaving a big stain on the stainless.

We had some tables that had the fixed castors on one end rather than swivel on all 4. They work fine if you have a lot of room to move around in, we never did. We had to be careful of when we used the tables with fixed wheels.

Your shop may be different, you have a lot less tables than we did. We had to go around machines and other tables all the time.

bordontn2
04-02-2009, 01:48 PM
Y'all.......Once worked at a shop in Fla.back in '61 Our tables had three sets of casters..Swivels at each end and stationary in the middle..If you've ever pushed a creeper across the floor you'll see "all swivels" takes you where you don't want to go!
The two stationary center ones will keep it in place while you spin it. Two stationarys and two swivels is a pain to place
where you want it..Just my thots.......
bordontn2

device
10-16-2009, 09:26 AM
here is what i made
10 feet long 4 feet wide 35 inches to the top..matches my shear height!
http://i583.photobucket.com/albums/ss276/rilusi123/DSCN1608.jpg

tnsam75
10-16-2009, 09:57 PM
I work on a 4'x12' wood table. Our metal comes in 4'x10' sheets so I can accommodate a full sheet and still have 2' for tools and scrap bin. Our skids come covered with 4x10 cardboard on top, so I use those on top of my table for doing quick layouts if I don't feel like busting out the puter. Once My table gets all marked up, I just flip my cardboard or get a new piece. Also, in the center of my table, I have a 3x8 hole cut close to the edge. Underneath the hole there is a 2 inch square tube firmly attached for my shrinker and stretcher. I love it. It's a good set up for me.

Bounder
10-17-2009, 03:29 PM
Nice table Device but it can't be sheet metal shop, I never saw one that clean.

device
10-17-2009, 03:36 PM
Nice table Device but it can't be sheet metal shop, I never saw one that clean.

well i thick to call it a stainless shop..
:)
i like to keep it clean ..dealing with clean room table and equipment for health care and such..
besides i have been called a premadonna ,what ever that means

device
10-17-2009, 03:37 PM
Nice table Device but it can't be sheet metal shop, I never saw one that clean.

well i thick to call it a stainless shop..
:)
i like to keep it clean ..dealing with clean room table and equipment for health care and such..
besides i have been called a premadonna ,what ever that means

jilt
03-09-2010, 08:21 AM
Here is a pic of my latest table I built for my shop. It's roughly 4x8 plus a 1 foot flip up extension. I have it rigged up with air cylinders so I can tilt it to work on my products without having to bend and reach over the table all day long. I used an aluminum extrusion (80/20) for the frame so I can easily attach jigs, clamps, and make my parts square. I used mdf for the top that just drops in for easy replacement. The main frame is heavy steel that I I have scrounged from job sites when working for a local construction company.

Bud
03-09-2010, 03:57 PM
Here is a pic of my latest table I built for my shop. It's roughly 4x8 plus a 1 foot flip up extension. I have it rigged up with air cylinders so I can tilt it to work on my products without having to bend and reach over the table all day long. I used an aluminum extrusion (80/20) for the frame so I can easily attach jigs, clamps, and make my parts square. I used mdf for the top that just drops in for easy replacement. The main frame is heavy steel that I I have scrounged from job sites when working for a local construction company.

Nice Job !

ibintinknockin
03-09-2010, 05:47 PM
i've seen one built from heavy gauge metal studs/track (14 gauge i think), 2'' x 8''s and 2'' x4''s , #14 screws, built well, plenty sturdy, no sharp edges , not too heavy, and it was all free scrap/left overs from a job site. it had Masonite covered plywood as a top with 2'' x ''2 x 1/4'' angle countersunk on each side .. the biggest expense were the casters ....

ps.. i have to add that this was in someones home/garage shop, but it was still a nice rolling table